Low Vitamin D Linked to Alzheimer’s Disease

Author: Pauline Anderson September 28, 2012 — Yet another study has linked low vitamin D levels with significant health issues — in this case, poor cognition. In this latest systematic review of the literature, people with Alzheimer’s disease (AD) had lower concentrations of vitamin D than those without AD, and better cognitive test results were linked to higher vitamin D concentrations. Overall, the results provide sufficient evidence to warrant further investigation to determine whether a cause-and-effect relationship exists, said lead author Cynthia Balion, PhD, a clinical...

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Sweets Shrinking Your Brain?

Even High Normal Blood Glucose Linked to Brain Atrophy September 5, 2012 — Even blood glucose levels in the range of high normal appear to be associated with brain atrophy, a new study shows. In a sample of randomly selected older middle-aged people, high normal levels of fasting plasma glucose were significantly associated with hippocampal and amygdalar atrophy over 4 years. These results should spur discussion of whether the range for blood glucose that is currently considered normal should be changed, researchers say. “This is just one study, so first we have to replicate it, but...

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Brain Abnormalities Common in Celiac Disease Patients

September 10, 2012 — Patients with celiac disease and neurologic symptoms have substantial structural and functional brain deficits as detected on magnetic resonance imaging (MRI), British investigators have observed. Stuart Currie, PhD, and colleagues from the University of Sheffield, United Kingdom, found that patients with celiac disease and balance disturbances had significantly smaller cerebellar volumes than age- and sex-matched controls. The same imaging studies showed significantly less grey matter density in multiple regions of the brain, including the cerebellum, among patients...

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51 BEST BRAIN FOODS

51 Healthy Brain Foods (Dr. Daniel Amen – Amen Clinics, Inc): Almonds (raw) Almond Milk (unsweetened) Apples Asparagus Avocados Bananas Beans (black, pinto, garbanzo) Bell peppers (yellow, red, green, orange) Beets Blackberries Blueberries Broccoli Brussels sprouts Carrot Cheese (low-fat) Cherries Chicken (skinless) Cranberries Egg whites (DHA enriched) Grapefruit Herring Honeydew Kiwi Lemons Lentils Limes Oats Olives Olive oil Oranges Peaches Peas Plums Pomegranates Potatoes Raspberries Red grapes Soybeans Spinach Strawberries Tea (green) Tofu Tomatoes Tuna Turkey...

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Concussion Treatment Consider Iron

Iron is important for oxygen transport to the body and brain. Oxygen is important for aerobic energy systems in brain. Aerobic energy versus anaerobic energy systems are important for minimizing by products of energy production that damage a neuron. A pro-active concussion plan involves ensuring adequate iron levels. The following is a handout from Bastyr University and is distributed with their permission. FOOD SOURCES OF IRON Foods and Supplements That Affect Iron Absorption There are two main types of iron, “heme” iron and non-heme iron. Heme, the more absorbable form of iron,...

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DEPRESSION DIETARY GUIDELINES

Traumatic brain injury and sport concussions can lead to depression. Following is a handout from Bastyr Center for Natural Health and is distributed with persmission. DEPRESSION DIETARY GUIDELINES Background The term depression has several meanings: (1) As a human affect, it arises from the disruption of life’s normal balance, usually following a loss, conflict or trauma (2) It can be a symptom of an underlying medical condition or the side effect of a medication (3) It’s also a clinical syndrome of varying severity, based on brain chemical (neurotransmitter) disturbances and (4) Finally,...

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